EAS Organisational Members

All Members

EAS Organisational Patrons

The European Southern Observatory (ESO), founded in 1962, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe. It builds and operates a suite of the world's most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.
Established in 1667, l'Observatoire de Paris is the largest astronomy centre in France. Located on three sites, in Paris, Meudon and Nançay, it has the mission to promote astronomical research, training, teaching and outreach.
Springer's business is publishing throughout the world, it provides scientific and professional communities with superior specialist information. Springer sponsors the "Springer Travel Grants" for EAS members.
FONDATION MERAC (Mobilising European Research in Astrophysics and Cosmology) is a non-profit foundation started in 2012 with headquarters in Switzerland to recognize and support young European astronomers. There are yearly three MERAC Prizes awarded by the EAS.
Based at the Jodrell Bank Observatory in the UK, the SKA Organisation is overseeing the design, construction and operation of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the world's largest radio telescope.
The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) , founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science.

EAS Organisational Sponsors

Founded in 1855, ETH Zurich is ranked as one of the best universities in the world. Research at the Institute for Astronomy focuses on star and planet formation, as well as extragalactic astrophysics, cosmology and dark matter.
Liverpool John Moores University is one of the leading research-active modern universities in the UK. Its Astrophysics Research Institute (ARI) is a centre of excellence for observational and theoretical research, telescope operation and instrument development, academic learning and outreach.
CEA is a French government-funded technological research organisation. Saclay, near Paris, is its main centre and hosts the "Service d'Astrophysique (SAp)", which is part of the Institute of Research into the Fundamental Laws of the Universe (Irfu).
Since 1920, the Italian Astronomical Society (SAIt) aims to promote astronomical studies and to spread scientific culture. Supported by the Ministry of Research and Education, SAIt is composed of about 500 professional members, both researchers and teachers.

EAS Organisational Affiliates

The University of Geneva, founded in 1559, is the second largest in Switzerland. Hosting the Geneva Observatory, it is internationally recognized for high-quality research and teaching in science and humanities.
EPFL is a top-ranked research and teaching institution that attracts some of the best intellects in the world to its campus in an idyllic spot overlooking Lake Geneva and facing the Alps. It hosts the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique.
The Eugenides Foundation was established in 1956 and was awarded the Gold Medal of the Athens Academy in 1965. It hosts one of the largest and best-equipped digital planetariums in the world.
The University of Liège is the only complete public university in the Belgian French-speaking community. Including the department of Astrophysics, Geophysics and Oceanography, it pursues excellence in teaching, research, and innovation.
The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) is one of the leading research centres in Spain, covering theoretical and observational research and instrumentation across most areas of Astrophysics. It has been selected as a "Severo Ochoa Center of Excellence" in research by the Spanish Government.
EDP Sciences, owned by learned societies, is since 1920 a publishing partner of the scientific communities. It produces and publishes international journals (e.g. Astronomy & Astrophysics), books (e.g. EAS Publication Series) and internet sites.
The Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) was founded in 1995 by the Max Planck Society to pursue research into the fundamental laws of gravitation. With a staff of about 300 people, it covers the entire field of General Relativity from gravitational wave detection to cosmology.
The Spanish Society of Astronomy (SEA), founded in 1992, brings together more than 500 professional astrophysicists and some Spanish amateur astronomers. Its main aim is to promote the development of astronomy in Spain.
The French astronomical society (Société Française d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique – SF2A) is composed of about 500 astronomy professionals. The society promotes astronomy and outreach in France.
The Hellenic Astronomical Society (Hel.A.S.) was established in 1993 and is the major organization of professional astronomers in Greece with nearly 250 members.

Patrons

EAS Organisational Patrons

The European Southern Observatory (ESO), founded in 1962, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe. It builds and operates a suite of the world's most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.
Established in 1667, l'Observatoire de Paris is the largest astronomy centre in France. Located on three sites, in Paris, Meudon and Nançay, it has the mission to promote astronomical research, training, teaching and outreach.
Springer's business is publishing throughout the world, it provides scientific and professional communities with superior specialist information. Springer sponsors the "Springer Travel Grants" for EAS members.
FONDATION MERAC (Mobilising European Research in Astrophysics and Cosmology) is a non-profit foundation started in 2012 with headquarters in Switzerland to recognize and support young European astronomers. There are yearly three MERAC Prizes awarded by the EAS.
Based at the Jodrell Bank Observatory in the UK, the SKA Organisation is overseeing the design, construction and operation of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the world's largest radio telescope.
The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) , founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science.

Sponsors

EAS Organisational Sponsors

Founded in 1855, ETH Zurich is ranked as one of the best universities in the world. Research at the Institute for Astronomy focuses on star and planet formation, as well as extragalactic astrophysics, cosmology and dark matter.
Liverpool John Moores University is one of the leading research-active modern universities in the UK. Its Astrophysics Research Institute (ARI) is a centre of excellence for observational and theoretical research, telescope operation and instrument development, academic learning and outreach.
CEA is a French government-funded technological research organisation. Saclay, near Paris, is its main centre and hosts the "Service d'Astrophysique (SAp)", which is part of the Institute of Research into the Fundamental Laws of the Universe (Irfu).
Since 1920, the Italian Astronomical Society (SAIt) aims to promote astronomical studies and to spread scientific culture. Supported by the Ministry of Research and Education, SAIt is composed of about 500 professional members, both researchers and teachers.

Affiliates

EAS Organisational Affiliates

The University of Geneva, founded in 1559, is the second largest in Switzerland. Hosting the Geneva Observatory, it is internationally recognized for high-quality research and teaching in science and humanities.
EPFL is a top-ranked research and teaching institution that attracts some of the best intellects in the world to its campus in an idyllic spot overlooking Lake Geneva and facing the Alps. It hosts the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique.
The Eugenides Foundation was established in 1956 and was awarded the Gold Medal of the Athens Academy in 1965. It hosts one of the largest and best-equipped digital planetariums in the world.
The University of Liège is the only complete public university in the Belgian French-speaking community. Including the department of Astrophysics, Geophysics and Oceanography, it pursues excellence in teaching, research, and innovation.
The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) is one of the leading research centres in Spain, covering theoretical and observational research and instrumentation across most areas of Astrophysics. It has been selected as a "Severo Ochoa Center of Excellence" in research by the Spanish Government.
EDP Sciences, owned by learned societies, is since 1920 a publishing partner of the scientific communities. It produces and publishes international journals (e.g. Astronomy & Astrophysics), books (e.g. EAS Publication Series) and internet sites.
The Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) was founded in 1995 by the Max Planck Society to pursue research into the fundamental laws of gravitation. With a staff of about 300 people, it covers the entire field of General Relativity from gravitational wave detection to cosmology.
The Spanish Society of Astronomy (SEA), founded in 1992, brings together more than 500 professional astrophysicists and some Spanish amateur astronomers. Its main aim is to promote the development of astronomy in Spain.
The French astronomical society (Société Française d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique – SF2A) is composed of about 500 astronomy professionals. The society promotes astronomy and outreach in France.
The Hellenic Astronomical Society (Hel.A.S.) was established in 1993 and is the major organization of professional astronomers in Greece with nearly 250 members.

Classes

The EAS has created in 2011 a new membership category, the Organisational Members. Organisational Members are either public or private entities which play an important role in European astronomy and express through their membership their support to the community of astronomers. A vibrant community is indeed essential to develop and keep a vigorous program of astronomical research in Europe.

The Organisational Membership of the EAS is divided in three different categories with different yearly fees and benefits:

  • Organisational Affiliates contribute to EAS yearly at least 1000 € and enjoy a series of interesting benefits.
  • Organisational Sponsors contribute to EAS yearly at least 2000 € and enjoy additional benefits to those of Organisational Affiliates.
  • Organisational Patrons contribute to EAS yearly at least 5000 € and enjoy additional benefits to those of Organisational Sponsors.
To become an Organisational Member, please contact the EAS Office.

Benefits

Benefits

Benefits of Organisational Membership of EAS

Described for three different sub-categories of organisational member
(March 2013)


EAS Organisational Affiliates

Yearly contribution to EAS: at least 1000 €

Benefits include:

General:
  • EAS web page listing, including logo, link, and short description of the organisation or company
  • Free placing of two Job advertisements per year (now free for all, but in future only free for members)
  • One free nominated EAS membership (within the limits of the EAS constitution)
Newsletter:
  • Short article (half page) presenting organisation/company in the EAS Newsletter (once, new members only)
EWASS:
  • One free registration at yearly EWASS
  • Discounted rate (50%) for exhibition space at yearly EWASS conference
  • Mention of new organisational members by EAS president during the opening ceremony of the yearly EWASS conference

EAS Organisational Sponsors

Yearly contribution to EAS: at least 2000 €

Benefits include, in addition to those enjoyed by Organisational Affiliates:

General:
  • Free placing of a total of five job advertisements per year (now free for all, but in future only free for members)
  • One free nominated EAS membership for every 2000 euro/year contributed to the EAS
Newsletter:
  • Possibility to provide additional visibility in or with the EAS Newsletter (such as advertisement, added flyer, etc.; at cost price)
EWASS:
  • One free registration at yearly EWASS for every 2000 €/year contributed to the EAS
  • Opportunity to include company flyers in EWASS registration packages (at cost price)
  • Mention of new organisational members by EAS president, and show company logo, during the opening ceremony of the yearly EWASS conference
  • Invitation (one person per Organisational Sponsor) to EAS reception during the EWASS conference. Other invitees may include EAS President and council members, MERAC council members, current prize winners, past Tycho Brahe prize winners and Lodewijk Woltjer lecturers, key invited plenary speakers.

EAS Organisational Patrons

Yearly contribution to EAS: at least 5000 €

Benefits include, in addition to those enjoyed by Organisational Sponsors:

General:
  • Unlimited free placing of Job advertisements (now free for all, but in future only free for members)
  • One free nominated EAS membership for every 2000 €/year contributed to the EAS (maximum 5 free memberships)
EWASS:
  • One free registration at yearly EWASS for every 2000 €/year contributed to the EAS (maximum 5 free registrations)
  • Free standard-size exhibition space at EWASS
  • Possibility of giving short presentation during EWASS conference, possibly in a suitably themed special parallel session (once, new Patrons only)
  • Invitation (two persons per organisational patron) to EAS reception during the EWASS conference. Other invitees may include EAS President and council members, MERAC council members, current prize winners, past Tycho Brahe prize winners and Lodewijk Woltjer lecturers, key invited plenary speakers.